Drawing and Painting Blackpink

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Drawing and Painting Blackpink

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Do you want to draw Blackpink and are looking for some inspiration? Then you’ve come to the right place!

Since I listen to quite a bit of Blackpink, I decided to draw portraits of all four band members after the release of Pink Venom. The drawings of Jennie, Jisoo, Lisa, and Rosé are all based on the music video for that very song.

Maybe the music video (or another) can inspire you to work on a piece of art as well.

Watercolor Portrait of Blackpink’s Jennie

Blackpink Jennie Portrait Drawing

Drawing the Sketch of Jennie

For the drawing of Jennie, I choose as a reference a moment in her solo scene in which she looks over her shoulder.

The focus of the sketch is initially only on the face and the shadows there. I only hint at the hairline with a few light strokes and decide to perhaps better define it more in a later step, after the skin has already been painted.

The jewelry on the tooth confuses me a bit. I don’t quite understand what it is or how to draw it. It doesn’t appear to be a ring, so I’m assuming it’s a piece of jewelry glued to her teeth.

Blackpink Jennie Sketch

Painting the Skin of Jennie

The light in Jennie’s solo scene looks natural, so the goal is also to paint a balanced skin tone that looks neither too warm nor too cold. If I were to incorporate a blue, her skin tone would look cold. But since it doesn’t look strikingly warm either, I opt for Permanent Carmine, a rather cold shade of red.

Color Palette for Skin Tones

  • Permanent Carmine for the undertone
  • Yellow Ochre for the midtone
  • Burnt Umber for the main tone

Blackpink Jennie Watercolor: Painting Skin

Painting the Eyes of Jennie

To shade the eyeball, I first use a very transparent layer of Permanent Carmine and Burnt Umber for the shadows. But since this looks too warm, I add a barely noticeable layer of cobalt blue hue at the end to neutralize the warmth.

For the iris, I start with a layer of Burnt Umber, finishing by painting a mixture of Permanent Carmine and Cobalt Blue Hue on top for the outer rim and the shadows just below the upper eyelids.

Blackpink Jennie Watercolor: Painting Eyes

Painting the Lips of Jennie

Red plays a big role in Jennie’s first solo scene, as she wears red clothing, which will take up a lot of space in the watercolor portrait as well.

I decide to use only Permanent Carmine for the lips. For the clothes later, I will probably mix permanent carmine and vermilion. Thanks to the Permanent Carmine, this way the two reds will match each other, but also not be identical one to one.

Blackpink Jennie Watercolor: Painting Lips

Painting the Red Cheetah Pattern Dress

Jennie wears a red dress with a cheetah pattern in the music video, which is transparent in places. Admittedly, it looks much harder to paint than it is.

First, I mix vermilion and permanent carmine. Permanent carmine so that this mixture can match the red of the lips. Then I grab my size 8 brush and irregularly draw the cheetah pattern over her body. Towards the right side at the back, these patterns become narrower as the back is turned away from the viewer and the viewer is looking at it from the side. Important: Don’t make the pattern longer, just narrower.

For the shadowy areas on the dress, I add cobalt blue hue and burnt umber to the mix. Burnt umber acts as a neutralizer here, as without it it would be a dark purple.

Blackpink Jennie Watercolor: Red Cheetah Dress

The spaces on the shoulder and back do not need to be filled, as the skin was already painted here in an earlier step. The ones on the neck and back of the head, where there is no background painted, need to be filled to believably represent a fabric.

For this, I use two transparent blends: Where the neck shows through, I mix in more burnt umber. Where the background shows through, I leave the mix at permanent carmine, vermilion, and a little cobalt blue hue (so this also looks slightly purple).

Transparent or not, fabrics cast wrinkles and need shading.

Blackpink Jennie Watercolor: Red Cheetah Dress

Painting the Hair of Jennie

There’s not much to see of Jennie’s hair, so it’s painted pretty quickly.

I get experimental towards the end and spontaneously decide to add gloss with opaque white to the upswept braid.

While I don’t regret this spontaneous decision, I wonder if the painting would look better without it, since it’s not entirely clear where the light is suddenly supposed to come from.

Blackpink Jennie Watercolor: Painting Hair

Watercolor Portrait of Blackpink’s Jisoo

Blackpink Jisoo Portrait Drawing

Drawing the Sketch of Jisoo

The reference for the sketch of Jisoo is a moment in her first solo scene.

At the time of the sketch, I am indecisive about whether I wanted to implement the hair ornament exactly like the original or differently. Therefore, I decide to only roughly hint at it for now and later spontaneously decide what it should be.

I already notice while sketching that the front strands of hair will be a challenge later because they thin out. This is not easy to depict with dark hair when working with watercolor, as the brush should be thin enough and the color should not be applied too pigmented.

Blackpink Jisoo Sketch

Painting the Skin of Jisoo

Jisoo’s skin looks a bit cool-toned in her first solo scene because of the light on the set. I want to apply this to the painting as well and decide to add a blue to the color palette.

Color Palette for Skin Tones

  • Vermilion for the undertone
  • Cobalt blue hue for the midtone
  • Burnt umber for the main tone

Blackpink Jisoo Watercolor: Painting Skin

Painting the Eyes of Jisoo

I start with the eyeball, using vermilion and cobalt blue hue for shading. I prefer to use colors that are already present in the skin for shading the eyeball. That way, the eyes blend in better with the face.

For the iris, I use mahogany brown and also use cobalt blue hue for the outer rim of the iris. Jisoo is most likely wearing colored contact lenses in the music video, but I see no reason not to try painting this color.

For the eyelids, I use gold, but the metallic shimmer is lost in the scanning process, leaving a shade that strongly resembles yellow ochre.

Blackpink Jisoo Watercolor: Painting Eyes

Painting the Lips of Jisoo

Jisoo has a very interesting lip shape due to the pointed cupid’s bow. When I painted it, I had to make sure that I shaded it in the right place to match its shape.

For the color of the lips, I mix vermilion, permanent carmine, and burnt umber and put transparent layers on top of each other one after the other.

Blackpink Jisoo Watercolor: Painting Lips

Painting Hair Accessory

I ultimately decided against coming up with a new hair accessory and therefore paint it exactly as it can be seen in the video.

For the blue beads, I use only cobalt blue hue, for the red stone a mixture of vermilion and permanent carmine. For the gold, I use a mixture of metallic gold, chrom. yellow hue lemon and yellow ocher. For the shaded areas, I add a little vermilion.

Blackpink Jisoo Watercolor: Hair Accessory

Painting the Hair of Jisoo

I mix Jisoos hair color from only two colors: Cobalt blue hue and mahogany brown. Depending on the mixing ratio, the hair may look more brown or purple in some places. To make the hair look especially dark, the color is applied opaque.

I fill the eyebrows with the same color mixture, although the color application here is transparent and gradual.

Blackpink Jisoo Watercolor: Painting Hair

If you want to paint such thin and fine strands of hair with a brush that look like they were drawn with a pencil, a size 0 brush is the best choice.

In addition to the brush size, the paint should not be too thick, nor should the brush be soaked with too much water. It is best to try out on a separate sheet whether thin lines can be drawn with the brush.

If everything is right, you can draw several fine strands of hair loosely and let them run out at the end.

Blackpink Jisoo Watercolor: Painting Strands of Hair

For gloss effects in the hair in watercolor, I resort to ordinary opaque white. Only when the whole hair is ready, do I apply it diluted with the brush size 0 where the hair reflects light.

As with pencil drawings, it is important to draw isolated hairs that are out of line. This makes the hair look more realistic.

Blackpink Jisoo Watercolor: Glossy Hair

Watercolor Portrait of Blackpink’s Lisa

Blackpink Lisa Portrait Drawing

Drawing the Sketch of Lisa

For Lisa’s drawing, I choose a moment from her solo scene where the head is turned to the side and slightly tilted up. This rotation is a bit of a challenge because the basics of drawing the head from a frontal view cannot be applied like this. All guidelines have to be adjusted according to the rotation.

Blackpink Lisa Sketch

Painting the Skin of Lisa

What is immediately noticeable about Lisa’s solo scene is the warm colors. Looking at the video, I’m not sure if they used warm light on set or if it was edited afterward to reduce the cold colors.

Painting Skin Tones

  • Vermilion for the undertone
  • Yellow ochre for the midtone
  • Burnt umber for the main tone

Blackpink Lisa Watercolor: Painting Skin

Painting the Eyes of Lisa

For Lisa’s irises, I use two colors: Yellow ocher and burnt umber. Compared to the others, her eyes are very bright in this scene so I avoid drawing a dark rim.

I also put a transparent layer of brilliant opera rose over the upper eyelids.

Blackpink Lisa Watercolor: Painting Eyes

Painting the Lips of Lisa

Lisa’s lips are matte in her solo scene. You can paint or draw matte lips realistically by adding a few wrinkles to the lips. You shouldn’t overdo it, though, or they will look dry and brittle.

I mix a color tone consisting of yellow ocher, burnt umber, vermilion, and a little bit of brilliant opera rose. Another point with matte lips is that you shouldn’t paint too much contrast between light and dark, as these are more suited for glossy lips.

Blackpink Lisa Watercolor: Painting Lipsa

Painting the Jacket of Lisa

The jacket Lisa is wearing in the scene is dark red and made of slightly shimmery fabric.

I use a mixture of brilliant opera rose, permanent carmine, and vermilion for the shade. I paint this over the entire sleeve first. In places where I want the red to be darker, I mix in cobalt blue hue and burnt umber. For the shine, I leave places blank for the first layer to shine through.

Blackpink Lisa Watercolor: Painting the Sleeve of a Jacket

Painting the Hair of Lisa

For Lisa’s hair color I mix a lot of colors: Mahogany brown (which already has an orange tint), yellow ochre, and vermilion. In places, I add permanent carmine and cobalt blue hue to paint dark areas.

A big challenge with Lisa’s hair is the bangs. While you have very good control over each hair when drawing, it’s not so easy when painting with brushes, even with a size 0 brush. The trick is to draw several transparent thin strokes and partially paint over them with opaque strokes.

Blackpink Lisa Watercolor: Painting Hair

Watercolor Portrait of Blackpink’s Rosé

Blackpink Rosé Portrait Drawing

Drawing the Sketch of Rosé

The template for Rosé’s drawing is a moment from her second solo scene.

The challenge in this drawing will be the many strands of her blonde hair falling on her face, which are guaranteed to need to be worked out with opaque white. It’s almost impossible to paint the skin with watercolor so that it looks even while leaving out the right areas for the hair.

Blackpink Rosé Sketch

Painting the Skin of Rosé

The colors I want to use for Rosé’s skin are almost the same ones I use for Jisoo’s skin. The only difference is that I couldn’t decide between vermilion and permanent carmine. Whenever that happens, I just mix both colors – problem solved!

Painting Skin Tones

  • A mixture of vermilion and permanent carmine for the undertone
  • Cobalt blue hue for the midtone
  • Burnt umber for the main tone

Blackpink Rosé Watercolor: Painting Skin

Painting the Eyes of Rosé

For the Iris of Rosé, I used many different colors to match the shade I wanted. I started by painting a base of a mixture of permanent carmine and cobalt blue hue.

I then added a layer of burnt umber on top to neutralize the purple. For the shadows and the dark rim, however, I use a mixture of cobalt blue hue and mahogany brown, as this mixture can get extra dark.

Blackpink Rosé Watercolor: Painting Eyes

Painting the Lips of Rosé

Rosé’s lips in her second solo scene are not fun to paint, as the lips seem to have some sort of lip gloss on them, and there are both highlights and shadows on the left side.

I start with a base color that I mix of burnt umber, permanent carmine, and vermilion. Once this layer is dry, I paint over it with another layer of brilliant opera rose and permanent carmine to paint the creases and shadows in the upper and lower lip.

For the shadows in the left area, I mix in cobalt blue hue to get a somewhat purple-looking red.

Blackpink Rosé Watercolor: Painting Lips

Painting the Choker of Rosé

I simplified Rose’s collar a lot and have to admit it was partly due to laziness. Add to that the fact that there is a water trail in the immediate vicinity and most of the collar would not have been seen properly anyway.

The color of the collar is a mixture of permanent carmine, umber burnt, and cobalt blue hue, which was applied with very little water.

Mund malen: Aquarell Rosé Blackpink

Painting the Hair of Rosé

Rosé has the top hair blond and the underlying hair dark brown in the video of Pink Venom. I choose to paint the blonde hair in detail and only roughly hint at the brown hair underneath.

Anyone who has ever dealt with hair bleaching surely knows that a yellow tint can be neutralized by a purple toner. That’s exactly how I go about mixing the shade here: I take yellow ochre and mix in a purple that has been blended through cobalt blue hue and permanent carmine. Together, it makes a cold, natural-looking blonde.

It’s only the first step, though, because once all the areas are dry, I go over them with several coats of opaque white to lighten the hair, draw in individual hairs, and touch up imperfections that couldn’t be avoided when painting the face.

In the end, I use a pencil to draw the eyelashes in all four portraits. Especially with eyelashes, the risk is too big for me to make a mistake with the brush that I can’t correct.

Mund malen: Aquarell Rosé Blackpink

More Blackpink Art

As a Blink, this is of course not the first time I have created Blackpink Art. You may have seen some of it in other articles or tutorials on How-to-Art.com.

Watercolor Portrait Blackpink Rosé Portrait of Rosé, Watercolor

Watercolor Portrait Blackpink Lisa Portrait of Lisa, Watercolor

Blackpink Lisa Drawing Portrait of Lisa, Pencil Drawing


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